Burn injury models of care: quality and cultural safety

Ms Sarah Fraser1, Associate Professor  Julian  Grant1, Dr Tamara Mackean1, Dr Kate Hunter2,5, Professor Andrew Holland3, Professor  Kathleen Clapham4, Professor Rebecca Ivers1,2,5, Associate Professor Warwick Teague6

1Flinders Univeristy, Adelaide, Australia, 2The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia, 3The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 4University of Wollongong , Wollongong, Australia, 5University of NSW, Sydney, Australia, 6University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract:
Background: Safety and quality in the systematic management of burn care is important to ensure optimal outcomes. It is not clear if or how burn injury models of care uphold these qualities, or if they provide a space for culturally safe health care for Indigenous peoples, especially for children. This presentation provides a critical review of publically available models of care analysing their ability to facilitate safe, high-quality burn care.

Methods: Models of care were identified and mapped against cultural safety principles in health care as described by Taylor and Guerin (2014), and against the National Health and Medical Research Council standard for clinical practice guidelines (2011).

Results: From the 53 documents found, 6 were eligible for review. Some aspects of cultural safety were addressed in the models, but not explicitly and were recorded very differently across all models. There was limited or no cultural consultation documented in the models of care reviewed. Quality in the documents against National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines was evident; however, description or application of quality measures was inconsistent and incomplete.

Discussion: Further research is indicated in many areas concerning safety and quality in documented care pathways for Indigenous peoples’ who sustain a burn injury and require burn care.

Biography:
Sarah is a PhD student at Flinders University working on a large NHMRC funded study involving burn injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Sarah is a registered nurse and works at the Aboriginal Health Council of SA in the quality systems team

 

About ANZBA

ANZBA is a not for profit organisation and the peak body for health professionals responsible for the care of the burn injured in Australia and New Zealand. ANZBA encourages higher standards of care through education, performance monitoring and research.

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